Bahrain GP: Vettel leads Ferrari front row lock-out

Sebastian Vettel claimed pole position for the Bahrain Grand Prix after pipping Ferrari Formula 1 teammate Kimi Raikkonen by 0.143s.

Bahrain GP: Vettel leads Ferrari front row lock-out
Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB14 Tag Heuer, crashes in qualifying
Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes-AMG F1 W09 EQ Power+
Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB14 Tag Heuer, crashes in qualifying
Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes AMG F1 W09
Esteban Ocon, Force India VJM11 Mercedes
Kevin Magnussen, Haas F1 Team VF-18 Ferrari
Lance Stroll, Williams FW41 Mercedes
Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB14 Tag Heuer, crashes in qualifying
Kimi Raikkonen, Ferrari SF71H
Carlos Sainz Jr., Renault Sport F1 Team R.S. 18
Stoffel Vandoorne, McLaren MCL33 Renault
Sergey Sirotkin, Williams FW41 Mercedes
Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB14

Raikkonen had the advantage after the first runs in Q3 by 0.095s from Vettel, but failed to improve on his second run.

Vettel, who had a precautionary change of the control electronics of his power unit ahead of qualifying, then banged in a lap of 1m27.958s using the supersofts that were the tyre of choice to secure his 51st F1 pole position.

Valtteri Bottas was third, just 23 thousandths of a second behind Raikkonen after making a two tenths improvement on his final lap.

That put him just ahead of Mercedes teammate Lewis Hamilton, who has a five-place grid penalty so is set to line up ninth.

Hamilton was the only driver to set his Q2 time using soft-compound Pirellis, so he will start the race on that tyre.

Daniel Ricciardo was fifth fastest, almost two tenths slower than Hamilton and almost a second clear of the chasing pack.

Pierre Gasly put in a superb performance to secure his best qualifying performance in F1 with sixth place, and is set to move up to a career best fifth on the grid.

Kevin Magnussen was just 29 thousandths of a second slower in seventh, with the Renaults of Nico Hulkenberg and Carlos Sainz sandwiching the Force India of Esteban Ocon in ninth.

Brendon Hartley missed out on making it two Toro Rossos in Q3 by less than a tenth of a second, after a small mistake in the final corner on his only effort in Q2 using fresh supersofts left him 11th.

That put him just ahead of Sergio Perez in the second Force India, with the McLarens of Fernando Alonso and Stoffel Vandoorne never looking to have top-10 pace and ending up 13th and 14th after struggling for grip.

Verstappen lost the rear of his Red Bull and spun exiting the slow Turn 2 left-hander while on the fourth lap of his Q1 run.

He hit the barrier with his front wing and front left wheel, which led to the session being red-flagged with five-and-half minutes remaining.

Verstappen ended Q1 fourth fastest, so technically made it to Q2, but was unable to run again after the crash and was classified 15th.

Romain Grosjean was fastest of those eliminated in Q1 despite setting an identical lap time to Alonso in the first segment of qualifying.

The Haas driver's late 1m30.530s lap during the five-and-a-half minutes of running after the red flag caused by Verstappen left him down in 16th and ranked behind Alonso, thanks to the McLaren driver setting his time first.

Grosjean subsequently complained over the radio about his out-lap being "a mess".

Sauber's Marcus Ericsson failed to improve on his third and final Q1 run and ended up 17th ahead of Williams driver Sergey Sirotkin, who had to rely on his first-run time.

Charles Leclerc declared himself to be "so stupid" over the radio after spinning at the final corner on his last lap and ending up 19th.

His best lap, set on the second of three sets of tyres as the Sauber drivers and Hartley managed to squeeze in two runs before the red flag, was just 0.006s slower than Sirotkin.

Lance Stroll was slowest, the Williams driver just under a tenth slower than Leclerc.

ClaDriverChassisEngineTimeGap
1 germany Sebastian Vettel  Ferrari Ferrari 1'27.958  
2 finland Kimi Raikkonen  Ferrari Ferrari 1'28.101 0.143
3 finland Valtteri Bottas  Mercedes Mercedes 1'28.124 0.166
4 australia Daniel Ricciardo  Red Bull TAG 1'28.398 0.440
5 france Pierre Gasly  Toro Rosso Honda 1'29.329 1.371
6 denmark Kevin Magnussen  Haas Ferrari 1'29.358 1.400
7 germany Nico Hulkenberg  Renault Renault 1'29.570 1.612
8 france Esteban Ocon  Force India Mercedes 1'29.874 1.916
9 united_kingdom Lewis Hamilton  Mercedes Mercedes 1'28.220 0.262
10 spain Carlos Sainz Jr.  Renault Renault 1'29.986 2.028
11 new_zealand Brendon Hartley  Toro Rosso Honda 1'30.105 2.147
12 mexico Sergio Perez  Force India Mercedes 1'30.156 2.198
13 spain Fernando Alonso  McLaren Renault 1'30.212 2.254
14 belgium Stoffel Vandoorne  McLaren Renault 1'30.525 2.567
15 netherlands Max Verstappen  Red Bull TAG    
16 france Romain Grosjean  Haas Ferrari 1'30.530 2.572
17 sweden Marcus Ericsson  Sauber Ferrari 1'31.063 3.105
18 russia Sergey Sirotkin  Williams Mercedes 1'31.414 3.456
19 monaco Charles Leclerc  Sauber Ferrari 1'31.420 3.462
20 canada Lance Stroll  Williams Mercedes 1'31.503 3.545
shares
comments
Bahrain GP: Raikkonen leads Red Bull drivers in FP3

Previous article

Bahrain GP: Raikkonen leads Red Bull drivers in FP3

Next article

McLaren "astonished" by lack of pace in Bahrain qualifying

McLaren "astonished" by lack of pace in Bahrain qualifying
Load comments
The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog Prime

The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog

A podium finisher in its first outing but then never again, the BRM P201 was a classic case of an opportunity squandered by disorganisation and complacency, says Stuart Codling.

The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from Prime

The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from

OPINION: The headlines were dominated by the Italian Grand Prix clash between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton, who had the halo to thank for avoiding potentially serious injury. But two days earlier, Formula 1 had a lucky escape with a Monza pitlane incident that could also have had grave consequences.

Formula 1
Sep 17, 2021
How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum Prime

How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum

With two sprint races under its belt, Formula 1 must now consider its options for them going forward. While they've helped deliver exciting racing on Sundays, the sprints themselves have been somewhat lacking - creating yet another conundrum for F1 to solve...

Formula 1
Sep 16, 2021
Who should Alfa Romeo sign for 2022's F1 season? Prime

Who should Alfa Romeo sign for 2022's F1 season?

OPINION: With Valtteri Bottas already signed up for 2022, all eyes are on the race for the second seat at Alfa Romeo next year. Antonio Giovinazzi is the current incumbent, but faces a tough competition from appealing short and long-term prospects

Formula 1
Sep 15, 2021
The "forced break" that was key to Ricciardo's Monza excellence Prime

The "forced break" that was key to Ricciardo's Monza excellence

OPINION: Daniel Ricciardo has long been considered one of Formula 1's elite drivers. But his struggles at McLaren since switching from Renault for 2021 have been painful to watch at times. Yet he's recovered to banish those memories with a famous Monza win – built on a critically important foundation

Formula 1
Sep 14, 2021
Italian Grand Prix driver ratings Prime

Italian Grand Prix driver ratings

Two drivers produced faultless performances as, for the second year in a row, Monza threw up an unpredictable result that left many to rue what might have been

Formula 1
Sep 13, 2021
Why Ricciardo would have won without Verstappen/Hamilton crash Prime

Why Ricciardo would have won without Verstappen/Hamilton crash

The clash between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton was the major flashpoint the 2021 Italian Grand Prix will be remembered for. Yet by this point, race leader Daniel Ricciardo had already done the hard work that would put him in position to end his and McLaren's lengthy win droughts, on a memorable afternoon in Monza

Formula 1
Sep 13, 2021
Why Italian GP success is on for McLaren even if Verstappen dominates Prime

Why Italian GP success is on for McLaren even if Verstappen dominates

For the second time in 2021, McLaren will line up for the start of a grand prix from the first row. It knows it has the chance of "glory" if things go well for Daniel Ricciardo and Lando Norris at the start of the 2021 Italian Grand Prix, but even if they just maintain their grid positions, signs from the rest of the Monza weekend suggest success is very possible for Formula 1's other orange army

Formula 1
Sep 12, 2021