FIA explains why Gasly was penalised for Alonso F1 clash

FIA Formula 1 race director Michael Masi says that Pierre Gasly was penalised for contact with Fernando Alonso in the Turkey GP because the Frenchman was deemed to be wholly to blame.

FIA explains why Gasly was penalised for Alonso F1 clash

Gasly touched Alonso's rear wheel at Turn 1 on the first lap, sending the Alpine driver into a spin, and ending any chance that the former world champion had of scoring points,

Often, first-lap contact is regarded by the stewards as a racing incident, but on this occasion the stewards agreed that Gasly should be penalised.

They also discounted the fact that Gasly had the Red Bull of Sergio Perez on his inside.

Gasly received a five-second penalty, which he took at his pitstop, as well as two points in his licence. He eventually finished sixth, just behind Lewis Hamilton.

The stewards initially said in their decision that Gasly "was predominantly at fault", but the verdict was later corrected to say the Frenchman was "wholly at fault".

"It should also be pointed out that the stewards do not consider this incident as an unavoidable Lap 1 Turn 1 contact between two cars, as GAS was not sandwiched between two cars when he touched ALO's car," the verdict added.

Masi stressed that the key thing was that Gasly was deemed to be responsible, in accordance with the procedures agreed before this season.

"One of the things if we go back to the start of the year, if you recall, pre the first event was that following discussions with the drivers and the teams is that we had to sort of ratchet back a little bit the let them race principles in general," he said.

"And one of them was first-lap incidents , and that if a driver was wholly to blame for an incident, then it would likely result in a penalty.

"And that one there was the stewards determined that Pierre was wholly to blame for the incident. And as a result, a five-second penalty was imposed."

Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB16B, Pierre Gasly, AlphaTauri AT02

Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB16B, Pierre Gasly, AlphaTauri AT02

Photo by: Andy Hone / Motorsport Images

Asked to compare the Turkish incident with the unpenalised first-lap contact between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton at Imola, Masi stressed that the cases were different.

"I think if you look at the Max and Lewis one, it's one of those the wholly or predominantly, under our regulations. So we've said, and the way that for ease of interpretation, let's call it, for everyone's benefit, is that if someone is wholly to blame on lap one, it will result in a penalty.

"If it takes two to tango, then it would be likely on lap one not result in anything, or if there's more than the two cars involved. But if it's quite clear, two cars, one has done it, then a penalty would happen."

Masi confirmed that the stewards had considered if Perez's presence alongside Gasly had played a role before discounting it.

"So that was one of the things why it probably took a little bit longer at the start there to have a closer look at, is that obviously Sergio was on the inside, but once it was quite clear from all of the footage and everything available, that's why they determined that it was a five second penalty."

Gasly himself insisted that Perez's presence did play a role, as he was trying to stay clear of the Red Bull.

"There was contact and I haven't really seen the footage" he said. "For me it was tight with Sergio inside me and Fernando was on the outside, so honestly there wasn't space, but yes there was contact.

"I did the penalty, I don't know if it was the right thing or not. I need to look at the footage first.

"I saw Fernando was there, I also saw Sergio was there, and I tried to go where I could. We know it is always usually not a good mix when there are that many cars. I don't have any other similar situation that comes to mind. That is just the way it is."

Read Also:

shares
comments

Related video

Mazepin: “Driving blind” in dirty spray caused near-miss with Hamilton
Previous article

Mazepin: “Driving blind” in dirty spray caused near-miss with Hamilton

Next article

"No regrets" for Leclerc or Ferrari over Turkey F1 tyre strategy

"No regrets" for Leclerc or Ferrari over Turkey F1 tyre strategy
Load comments
The six subplots to watch in 2022 as a new F1 era begins Prime

The six subplots to watch in 2022 as a new F1 era begins

As Formula 1 prepares to begin a new era of technical regulations in 2022, We pick out six other key elements to follow this season

Why newly-retired Kimi Raikkonen won't miss F1 Prime

Why newly-retired Kimi Raikkonen won't miss F1

After 349 grand prix starts, 46 fastest laps, 21 wins and one world championship, Kimi Raikkonen has finally called time on his F1 career. In an exclusive interview with Motorsport.com on the eve of his final race, he explains his loathing of paddock politics and reflects on how motorsport has changed over the past two decades.

Formula 1
Jan 23, 2022
Unpacking the technical changes behind F1 2022's rules shake-up Prime

Unpacking the technical changes behind F1 2022's rules shake-up

Formula 1 cars will look very different this year as the long-awaited fresh rules finally arrive with the stated aim of improving its quality of racing. We break down what the return of 'ground effect' aerodynamics - and a flurry of other changes besides - means for the teams, and what fans can expect

Formula 1
Jan 21, 2022
Why F1's new era is still dogged by its old world problems Prime

Why F1's new era is still dogged by its old world problems

OPINION: The 2022 Formula 1 season is just weeks away from getting underway, but instead of focusing on what is to come, the attention still remains on what has been – not least the Abu Dhabi title decider controversy. That, plus other key talking points, must be resolved to allow the series to warmly welcome in its new era

Formula 1
Jan 20, 2022
The Schumacher trait that will give Haas hope in F1 2022 Prime

The Schumacher trait that will give Haas hope in F1 2022

Mick Schumacher’s knack of improving during his second season in a championship was a trademark of his junior formula career, so his progress during his rookie Formula 1 campaign with Haas was encouraging. His target now will be to turn that improvement into results as the team hopes to reap the rewards of sacrificing development in 2021

Formula 1
Jan 19, 2022
The “glorified taxi” driver central to F1’s continued safety push Prime

The “glorified taxi” driver central to F1’s continued safety push

As the driver of Formula 1’s medical car, Alan van der Merwe’s job is to wait – and hope his skills aren’t needed. James Newbold hears from F1’s lesser-known stalwart.

Formula 1
Jan 15, 2022
When BMW added F1 'rocket fuel' to ignite Brabham's 1983 title push Prime

When BMW added F1 'rocket fuel' to ignite Brabham's 1983 title push

There was an ace up the sleeve during the 1983 F1 title-winning season of Nelson Piquet and Brabham. It made a frontrunning car invincible for the last three races to see off Renault's Alain Prost and secure the combination's second world title in three years

Formula 1
Jan 13, 2022
How “abysmal” reliability blunted Brabham’s first winner Prime

How “abysmal” reliability blunted Brabham’s first winner

Brabham’s first world championship race-winning car was held back by unreliable Climax engines – or so its creators believed, as STUART CODLING explains

Formula 1
Jan 10, 2022