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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Mexican GP: Latest F1 tech updates, straight from pitlane

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Mexican GP: Latest F1 tech updates, straight from pitlane
By:
Co-author: Matthew Somerfield
Oct 25, 2019, 12:23 AM

Giorgio Piola and Sutton Images bring you the Formula 1 technical updates on show in the Mexico City pitlane at the Mexican Grand Prix, giving insight into the relentless development undertaken by the teams in pursuit of more performance.

Click on the arrows to cycle through the images below...

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Front suspension of Toro Rosso STR14

Front suspension of Toro Rosso STR14
1/15

Photo by: Simon Galloway / Motorsport Images

A good look at the Toro Rosso STR14 while it’s still bare and awaiting assembly. Note the various conduits used to transport airflow around the front upright and brake assembly.

Engine cover of Toro Rosso STR14

Engine cover of Toro Rosso STR14
2/15

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Toro Rosso will not only run a much larger cooling outlet at the rear of its car in Mexico, catering for the altitude and power unit demands, it also have an enlarged T-Wing solution.

Ferrari SF90, bargeboard

Ferrari SF90, bargeboard
3/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Up close and personal with Ferrari’s bargeboard region, note how it uses slots in the upper elements to mirror slots in the lower surfaces in order that it maintains legality.

Ferrari SF90, rear suspension

Ferrari SF90, rear suspension
4/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The area around the rear tyre has been developed heavily by teams in recent history and as we can see from Ferrari that means a plethora of slots and winglets are being used to control how the airflow spilt off the rear tyre impinges on the flow around the rear coke bottle and into the diffuser. In the case of Ferrari, it’s interesting to see the slot in the floor to the left of the vertical strake.

Ferrari SF90, rear wing

Ferrari SF90, rear wing
5/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A close up of Ferrari’s rear wing for Mexico, as the team utilises what would ordinarily be seen as a high downforce configuration.

Racing Point RP19

Racing Point RP19
6/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

The large torpedo-shaped appendage on the side of the RP19 encloses a thermal-imaging cameras that monitors the tyre’s behaviour during Free Practice, giving the engineers vital data to work with for qualifying and the race. It’s shaped like this in order to limit the aerodynamic impact it has on other areas of the car.

Racing Point RP19

Racing Point RP19
7/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This teardrop-shaped add-on in the Racing Point RP19 not only offers support for the driver’s helmet when he’s in the cockpit but also reduces buffeting and other aerodynamic inconsistencies within that region.

Red Bull Racing RB15, side

Red Bull Racing RB15, side
8/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Cooling performance is paramount in the rarified air at the Mexican GP, so Red Bull has opened up some cooling in the transition around the halo.

Red Bull Racing RB15, rear

Red Bull Racing RB15, rear
9/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

At the rear of the car Red Bull has opted for the largest cooling outlet of the season so far, with exits also opened up around the suspension’s upper wishbones.

Red Bull Racing RB15, side

Red Bull Racing RB15, side
10/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

This side-on shot of the RB15 shows just how large those new openings are around the rear leg of the upper wishbone, while the team have also opted for a single element T-Wing as the drag penalty is lowered significantly at altitude.

Williams Racing FW42, front wing

Williams Racing FW42, front wing
11/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A side-by-side of the two front wings used by Williams in Japan and to be tested once more in Mexico. The new wing on the left is proportioned differently in terms of the upper flaps, with less real estate afforded to the adjustable section.

Williams Racing FW42, front wing

Williams Racing FW42, front wing
12/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

A nice shot of Williams' newer-specification front wing from behind.

Williams Racing FW42, bargeboard

Williams Racing FW42, bargeboard
13/15

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

An overview of the bargeboard, sidepod deflector and the other furniture surrounding the sidepod on the Williams FW42.

Front wing of Racing Point RP19

Front wing of Racing Point RP19
14/15

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Another look at the revised nose introduced by Racing Point at the Belgian GP and features elongated wing pillars with four slots in.

Front wing of Racing Point RP19

Front wing of Racing Point RP19
15/15

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

The new nose design was paired with a new front wing too, with the outboard section of the wing redesigned, proportioning more of the outer section to deal with disrupting tyre wake.

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About this article

Series Formula 1
Event Mexican GP
Sub-event Thursday
Author Giorgio Piola