Loris Capirossi Q&A: "Valentino must turn the page"

MotoGP veteran and Dorna Sports safety advisor Loris Capirossi talks to Oriol Puigdemont about the explosive finale to the 2015 season, Casey Stoner's test return and the new rule changes for 2016.

Loris Capirossi Q&A: "Valentino must turn the page"
Loris Capirossi
Valentino Rossi, Yamaha Factory Racing
Marc Marquez, Repsol Honda Team and Valentino Rossi, Yamaha Factory Racing
Valentino Rossi, Yamaha Factory Racing
Jorge Lorenzo, Yamaha Factory Racing and Marc Marquez, Repsol Honda Team and Valentino Rossi, Yamaha Factory Racing
Marc Marquez, Repsol Honda Team
Marc Marquez, Repsol Honda Team
Valentino Rossi, Yamaha Factory Racing
Loris Capirossi, Pramac Racing Team
Casey Stoner, Ducati Team
Casey Stoner, Ducati Desmosedici GP15
Casey Stoner, Ducati Team
Michelin logo in pit lane
Jorge Lorenzo, Yamaha Factory Racing

How would you ease the tension with which the 2015 season ended?

"I've come to the test to analyse how the riders are adapting to the Michelin tyres, but it's obvious that the way last season ended would come up. The best thing for everybody is to forget all that and focus on this year, that's my advice for all the riders."

But during Yamaha's launch a few days ago in Barcelona, Rossi didn't appear to have turned the page.

"He must. To have decided to keep on racing is a great motivation, and he's also in very good form, but he has to forget about that and focus on the bike."

Can you understand both versions of the story?

"Of course I can. Valentino had a great season, from the first race in which he took the lead, and he stayed up there until Valencia, where he lost the title. But Marc, on the other hand, probably felt he was blamed for something that had nothing to do with him."

Is there a non-written rule that says that a rider who is not fighting for the title can't interfere?

"It doesn't exist, but the most important thing is the respect between the riders. It's important to get along with those who share the track with you and to respect them in the same way you expect them to respect you."

Is Marquez the rider who takes the most risks? 

"His riding style makes it look that way. But it's also true that last year he raced with a bike that was not so competitive and that's why he crashed more than the others.

"In 2014 he crashed a lot less despite it being his debut season. His riding style makes it look like he's taking more risks, but he's doing more or less the same as his rival."

Is Dorna making the right decision to leave the sanctioning body?

"There's nothing decided yet. It's obvious that FIM has always had a fundamental ruling body, and that the final decisions are taken by them. This role will probably increase and that's a good thing."

You raced until you were 37, the same age as Rossi will be this month. How long do you think he can stay this competitive?

"In 2015 Valentino was scary and I have the feeling that this year he will be very quick. The changes introduced this year are a motivation to him. It will all depend on how hungry he is. He still has a few good years left, but it will depend on what happens in 2016."

What do you think Stoner can bring to Ducati?

"I've spoken to him and I noticed that he has a different outlook. He's very excited, he has the speed inside and he can offer very good feedback because he has a lot of experience with different bikes. It's also a good motivator for the racing riders, who know the tester is very fast."

What do you mean when you say a different outlook?

"I see him very calm, relaxed, serene. He has always been very a introverted guy who never gave much away. Now, however, he's very interested in the project, he's following it very closely and with a very constructive attitude."

Would you be worried if you were Iannone or Dovizioso?

"Casey has been quick every time he has been on the bike, but having been away from the races two or three years makes everything more complicated. I'm sure he would be quick over one lap, but being quick over a full race would be a different thing."

Are the riders that scared about the Michelin tyres?

"The problem is that they had been with Bridgestone for a long time, and Michelin is not Bridgestone, especially when it comes to the front tyre.

"Michelin has worked a lot during the winter and it has brought different compounds, but in any case the feeling will not be the same as with Bridgestone. There's no choice but to adapt the riding style a bit."

Will it be a similar transition with the new electronics?

"The change will not be easy either because most of the top teams had been developing their own electronics for a while, so they were way ahead of what they will be using from now, which is a good unit, but simple. It has a very good level, but they will need to fine-tune it."

shares
comments
Lorenzo boosted by "huge" Sepang test advantage
Previous article

Lorenzo boosted by "huge" Sepang test advantage

Next article

Ducati "couldn't say no" to Stoner if he wants to race

Ducati "couldn't say no" to Stoner if he wants to race
Load comments
Why KTM's latest young outcast is a cautionary tale for MotoGP Prime

Why KTM's latest young outcast is a cautionary tale for MotoGP

Iker Lecuona’s absence from the 2022 MotoGP grid after losing his KTM ride will likely pass most onlookers by. But after just 30 race starts in a MotoGP move he was sucked into by circumstance, the World Superbike-bound 21-year-old's story should act as a warning to KTM - and MotoGP as a whole - in regards to its future stars

MotoGP
Jan 4, 2022
How Ducati's expanded roster will threaten MotoGP's balance in 2022 Prime

How Ducati's expanded roster will threaten MotoGP's balance in 2022

That Ducati will compete with eight prototypes in MotoGP this year is nothing new, having already done so between 2016 and 2018. But the involvement and coverage of the Borgo Panigale company in its alliances is now much greater than in past years, which could have the effect of unbalancing the premier class

MotoGP
Jan 3, 2022
Ranking the top 10 MotoGP riders of 2021 Prime

Ranking the top 10 MotoGP riders of 2021

Although Fabio Quartararo wrapped up the 2021 MotoGP title with two rounds to go, the Yamaha rider had strong competition from the revitalised Ducati factory team and a revitalised Marc Marquez. Read on to see who makes our top 10 list.

MotoGP
Dec 23, 2021
How Quartararo cast aside prior doubts to become MotoGP's new king Prime

How Quartararo cast aside prior doubts to become MotoGP's new king

Doubts were cast over Yamaha’s French recruit after his disastrous end to the 2020 MotoGP season with Petronas SRT, but Fabio Quartararo answered them convincingly in 2021 to claim a MotoGP title that exhibited both his devastating speed and mental strength

MotoGP
Dec 7, 2021
The Rossi-less future MotoGP must now navigate Prime

The Rossi-less future MotoGP must now navigate

Motorcycle racing's greatest showman has left the stage, as Valentino Rossi calls time on his remarkable career on two wheels. But in his successors, all of whom were inspired by 'the Doctor', grand prix racing has vibrant new acts to keep us hooked

MotoGP
Dec 4, 2021
Valentino Rossi’s 10 greatest MotoGP races Prime

Valentino Rossi’s 10 greatest MotoGP races

As the Italian legend finally bows out and retires from MotoGP, it marks the end of one of the most incredible careers in motorsport history. Here is Motorsport.com's pick of his best rides and the stories behind them

MotoGP
Dec 3, 2021
How Ducati has drawn first blood in the 2022 MotoGP title race Prime

How Ducati has drawn first blood in the 2022 MotoGP title race

The 2021 MotoGP season may have only just ended but preparations for 2022 are well underway following a two-day test at Jerez this week. Ducati has hit the ground running while a lack of progress dominated Yamaha’s and world champion Fabio Quartararo’s test. While no battle lines have been drawn yet for 2022, it appears Ducati has already drawn first blood...

MotoGP
Nov 20, 2021
Why Suzuki's quest for a new MotoGP boss may be too late Prime

Why Suzuki's quest for a new MotoGP boss may be too late

Suzuki is on the search for a new team manager after its decision not to replace Davide Brivio at the start of 2021 was backed up by its unsuccessful bid to help Joan Mir defend his 2020 MotoGP world title. But whoever Shinichi Sahara appoints next, it may have already come too late to convince Mir to stick with the project

MotoGP
Nov 19, 2021