Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
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Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Tech insight: Williams introduces new bargeboard package

Williams has emerged in Silverstone with a new bargeboard package, as it seeks to reinvigorate a difficult Formula 1 season at its home grand prix.

Tech insight: Williams introduces new bargeboard package

Having struggled to define its development path throughout the season so far, new parts have come as something of a premium for Williams throughout 2019.

For the British Grand Prix, the team has redefined the turning vane package around the sidepod inlet, with a new upper element. Previously, the element was of a consistent curvature, and bridged the transition to the vertical turning vane – but now, these two parts have been split.

The leading edge now sweeps downward, before curving back up towards the outboard edge, but further down the chord length it sweeps upwards more dramatically.

This suggests a more concerted effort to take airflow from lower down, closer to the inlet aperture, and working it harder to bring it over the top of the sidepod.

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Meanwhile, the curved ends will generate some degree of tip vortex, but the upward curling of the outboard section can determine the placement of this vortex.

In a normal, horizontal wing element, the tip vortex is created as a result of the high pressure air on top and the low pressure air underneath coalescing, creating a larger and more unruly flow structure.

By creating that curl, the difference in pressure zones aren't nearly as large, and so any vortex generated is a lot tighter-knit.

This can then wash over the sidepod and move towards the rear, where the properties of that flow structure are useful.

This ties in with a new mirror assembly, which features a new aerodynamic shroud around it - not dissimilar to the shroud around the mirror design it used in pre-season testing.

Williams FW42

Williams FW42

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Concerns over this mirror – which was curved in shape and was problematic for the drivers' rear-view vision – led to a hasty redesign for the season opener in Australia. This has now been redeveloped, sending laminar airflow downwards to trim the low pressure region developed by the mirrors, which minimises the overall drag.

Renault, Mercedes and Red Bull use similar mirror designs to reduce their impact on the overall aerodynamics package.

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