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Major changes unlikely for 2024 SUPER GT regulations

SUPER GT is unlikely to see a dramatic change when the next cycle of GT500 regulations begins in 2024, series boss Masaaki Bandoh has indicated.

GT500 Start action

GT500 Start action

Masahide Kamio

Since 2020 the Japanese sportscar series has used the Class One regulations that were developed jointly with the DTM, and committed to keeping them even after the German series switched to GT3 regulations in 2021.

Originally a new set of rules were due for introduction in 2023, but the onset of the global coronavirus pandemic prompted a one-year freeze and subsequent delay, meaning the current rules will be in use for one more season once the current campaign ends.

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GT500 cars are built around a common chassis constructed by Toray Carbon Magic, and GTA chairman Bandoh has indicated a desire to keep this as the basis for the 2024 rules, citing the fact that Nissan driver Mitsunori Takaboshi was able to walk away from his huge crash at Fuji in May unscathed.

But he said that the DTM’s decision to abandon the Class One platform does allow SUPER GT a “degree of freedom” to do things its own way.

“When we consider the recent big crash for the #3 [NDDP Racing Nissan] that Takaboshi walked away from despite the big G-forces involved, we are thinking of keeping the monocoque,” said Bandoh at last month’s Suzuka race. 

“It would be good to have a degree of freedom while maintaining that safety.”

A big crash in the Fuji Golden Week race for the #3 Nissan Z brought safety into renewed focus

A big crash in the Fuji Golden Week race for the #3 Nissan Z brought safety into renewed focus

Bandoh however dismissed the prospect of expanding the scope for aerodynamic development, which is already strictly limited in the name of cost-saving.

GT500 manufacturers have to homologate aero designs to be used for the whole season ahead of the start of the campaign, while a so-called ‘design line’ separates the upper part of the car that must match the shape of the road car upon which it is based, and the lower area that is open for development.

“It’s ok if it’s a part that the spectators can understand,” Bandoh said. “But it’s a question of how much money gets spent on things that can't be seen.

“We’re working hard on making the series more environmentally-friendly and doing things the spectators can see, but we can’t see the point of excessive aero development, so I don’t think we will allow this.”

SUPER GT has announced that it will switch to fully carbon-neutral fuel next year, while the introduction of 450km races at three events this season has also been aimed at promoting fuel efficiency and tyre longevity over outright speed.

“There’s also still the question of reducing costs with the Class One regulations,” added Bandoh. “Why would we allow more aero development when we’re not looking to make the cars any quicker than they already are?

“We want to continue seeing aero development done within certain restrictions.”

  • Stream every qualifying session and race of the 2022 SUPER GT season only on Motorsport.tv.

 

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